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Reading for January 23, 2020

Today’s reading is Irenaeus of Lyon, Against the Heresies, Book 2, chh. 30-33:

ANF 1:403-411

Stained glass window of St Irenaeus in the Church of St-Irénée, Lyon, France, by Lucien Bégule (1848-1935)

Reading for January 22, 2020

Today’s reading is Irenaeus of Lyon, Against the Heresies, Book 2, chh.  25-29:

ANF 1:396-403

Stained glass window of St Irenaeus in the Church of St-Irénée, Lyon, France, by Lucien Bégule (1848-1935)

Reading for January 21, 2020

Today’s reading is Irenaeus of Lyon, Against the Heresies, Book 2, chh. 20-24:

ANF 1:387-396

Stained glass window of St Irenaeus in the Church of St-Irénée, Lyon, France, by Lucien Bégule (1848-1935)

Reading for January 20, 2020

Today’s reading is Irenaeus of Lyon, Against the Heresies, book 2, chh. 15-19:

ANF 1:379-387

Stained glass window of St Irenaeus in the Church of St-Irénée, Lyon, France, by Lucien Bégule (1848-1935)

Reading for January 19, 2020

Today’s reading is Irenaeus of Lyon, Against the Heresies, Book 2, chh. 11-14:

ANF 1:370-379

Stained glass window of St Irenaeus in the Church of St-Irénée, Lyon, France, by Lucien Bégule (1848-1935)

Some highlights from Irenaeus, Against the Heresies Book 1

Irenaeus of Lyons

I must confess it as a personal weakness that I do not find Irenaeus’ descriptions of the beliefs of Valentinians, Ptolemaeans, Gnostics, and other such groups very interesting. In fact, I find it almost intolerable. If any of you are of a different disposition, please chime in in the comments! In fact, seven years ago, in 2013, when Read the Fathers did its first round, Book 1 of Irenaeus is where I fell off the wagon — it didn’t help that I was hunting manuscripts in Florence at the time, I reckon.

One moment I found illuminating was in chapter 6, where the Perfect seem to be so simply through their gnosis, not through their mode of life. They can live as they please, having been made perfect through this knowledge already. This matches the description of such groups (broadly termed ‘gnostic’ by everyone else) as I read in Gabriel Bunge’s book Spiritual Fatherhood.

For the rest, here are some passages I appreciated, taken from ANF.

1.8.3: Learn then, you foolish men, that Jesus who suffered for us, and who dwelt among us, is Himself the Word of God. For if any other of the Æons had become flesh for our salvation, it would have been probable that the apostle spoke of another. But if the Word of the Father who descended is the same also that ascended, He, namely, the Only-begotten Son of the only God, who, according to the good pleasure of the Father, became flesh for the sake of men, the apostle certainly does not speak regarding any other, or concerning any Ogdoad, but respecting our Lord Jesus Christ. For, according to them, the Word did not originally become flesh. For they maintain that the Saviour assumed an animal body, formed in accordance with a special dispensation by an unspeakable providence, so as to become visible and palpable. But flesh is that which was of old formed for Adam by God out of the dust, and it is this that John has declared the Word of God became. Thus is their primary and first-begotten Ogdoad brought to nought. For, since Logos, and Monogenes, and Zoe, and Phōs, and Soter, and Christus, and the Son of God, and He who became incarnate for us, have been proved to be one and the same, the Ogdoad which they have built up at once falls to pieces. And when this is destroyed, their whole system sinks into ruin — a system which they falsely dream into existence, and thus inflict injury on the Scriptures, while they build up their own hypothesis.

All of 1.10!

1.12.2: He, as soon as He thinks, also performs what He has willed; and as soon as He wills, also thinks that which He has willed; then thinking when He wills, and then willing when He thinks, since He is all thought, [all will, all mind, all light,] all eye, all ear, the one entire fountain of all good things.

1.22: 1. The rule of truth which we hold, is, that there is one God Almighty, who made all things by His Word, and fashioned and formed, out of that which had no existence, all things which exist. Thus says the Scripture, to that effect By the Word of the Lord were the heavens established, and all the might of them, by the spirit of His mouth. And again, All things were made by Him, and without Him was nothing made. John 1:3 There is no exception or deduction stated; but the Father made all things by Him, whether visible or invisible, objects of sense or of intelligence, temporal, on account of a certain character given them, or eternal; and these eternal things He did not make by angels, or by any powers separated from His Ennœa. For God needs none of all these things, but is He who, by His Word and Spirit, makes, and disposes, and governs all things, and commands all things into existence — He who formed the world (for the world is of all) — He who fashioned man — He [who] is the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, above whom there is no other God, nor initial principle, nor power, nor pleroma — He is the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, as we shall prove. Holding, therefore, this rule, we shall easily show, notwithstanding the great variety and multitude of their opinions, that these men have deviated from the truth; for almost all the different sects of heretics admit that there is one God; but then, by their pernicious doctrines, they change [this truth into error], even as the Gentiles do through idolatry — thus proving themselves ungrateful to Him that created them. Moreover, they despise the workmanship of God, speaking against their own salvation, becoming their own bitterest accusers, and being false witnesses [against themselves]. Yet, reluctant as they may be, these men shall one day rise again in the flesh, to confess the power of Him who raises them from the dead; but they shall not be numbered among the righteous on account of their unbelief.

  1. Since, therefore, it is a complex and multiform task to detect and convict all the heretics, and since our design is to reply to them all according to their special characters, we have judged it necessary, first of all, to give an account of their source and root, in order that, by getting a knowledge of their most exalted Bythus, you may understand the nature of the tree which has produced such fruits.

Reading for January 18, 2020

Today’s reading is Irenaeus of Lyon, Against the Heresies, Book 2, chh. 4-10:

ANF 1:362-370

Stained glass window of St Irenaeus in the Church of St-Irénée, Lyon, France, by Lucien Bégule (1848-1935)

A wee intro to Book 2 of Against the Heresies

Today we begin Book 2 of Against the Heresies. In this book, Irenaeus seeks to overthrow the teachings he has enumerated in painful detail throughout Book 1. Here is John Behr’s schematization of the structure from his book Irenaeus of Lyons, p. 87:

Book Two: Overthrowal
Preface
I. One God (haer. 2.1-19)

The logical necessity for this (haer. 2.1-10)
The truth that there is one God the Creator of all by his Word (haer. 2.11)
Questions to those who teach otherwise (haer. 2.11-19)

II. Christ (haer. 2.20-28)

The supposed analogies with his parables and actions (haer. 2.20-24)
The proper mode of enquiry (haer. 2.25-28)

III. Anthropology (haer. 2.29-30.8)

Conclusion (haer. 2.30.9)

Recapitulation and refutation of other heresies (haer. 2.31.1-35.3)

Notice of further work (haer. 2.35.4)

Reading for January 17, 2020

Today’s reading is Irenaeus of Lyon, Against the Heresies, Book 1, ch. 30 – Book 2, ch. 3:

ANF 1:354-362

Stained glass window of St Irenaeus in the Church of St-Irénée, Lyon, France, by Lucien Bégule (1848-1935)

Quick remarks on Pseudo-Justin

Stained glass window of Justin Martyr from the Church of St. Mary the Great, Cambridge (Photo credit: Lawrence OP / Foter / CC BY-NC-ND)

Apologies that my week-in-review posts come so late. Last week (January 5-11) we read good portion of works wrongly attributed to Justin Martyr. Here we met many of the common objections to pagan polytheism and Greek mythology as well as somewhat more refined attempts to overthrow Greek philosophy, although I doubt these would convince any thoroughly educated philosopher.

We also saw the story of the translation of the Septuagint, the Greek Old Testament, by 70 independent scholars in the days of Ptolemy. This myth is widely abroad in the pre-modern Christian world, and it is assurance that the Greek version of the Scriptures is accurate.

I did not have available the dates of these texts when putting together the Introduction to Justin, so I give them now, using Quasten, Patrology, Vol. 1:

‘Discourse to the Greeks’ – First half of the third century (Quasten Vol. 1, p. 206). Anonymous text written in a different style from Justin’s.

‘Exhortation to the Greeks’ – Third century (Quasten Vol. 1, p. 205). Anonymous text in a different style from Justin’s.

‘On the Sole Government of God’ – Markovich dates it before 311, likely third century (Cohortatio ad Graecos / De monarchia / Oratio ad Graecos, p. 82)

The large fragments of On the Resurrection preserved in John of Damascus’ Sacra Parallela have had their authenticity questioned; Quasten provides no proposed date.

In closing: What caught your eye as you read these texts? What about the martyrdom of Justin?

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